Devolution of Evolution. Acrylic Mediums, Ground Down & Hardened Acrylic Paint, Metal Rods & Quartz

Devolution of Evolution. Acrylic Mediums, Ground Down & Hardened Acrylic Paint, Metal Rods & Quartz

Marc Ross

Reynoldsburg, OH

geek1952@hotmail.com
www.bonfoey.com

www.artaccessgallery.com

Education

1980   MFA  Kent State University
1975   BFA   Ohio University

Solo Exhibitions

2015   No Explanation Needed, Columbus Cultural Arts                                 Center Veils, Ohio University (Chillicothe, OH)
2005  Gallery 853 (Columbus, OH)
2001   Franklin University (Columbus, OH)

Group Exhibitions

2016   80th Mid-Year Exhibition, Butler Institute of Art
2015   79th Mid-Year Exhibition, Butler Institute of Art
           Contemporaries 2015, Bonfoey Gallery (Cleveland, OH) 
             Inaugural Juried Exhibit, Riffe Gallery (Columbus, OH)
2014   Art Access Gallery (Bexley, OH)
2008  Southern Ohio Museum (Portsmouth, OH)
2006  The Hun Gallery
1997   Klutznick National Jewish Museum

Artist Statement

When I first handled this very large, thick-shelled egg, it brought to mind the primal ancestors from which this oversized, flightless bird may have descended.  The bipedalism and maneuverability of the ostrich has been studied in relation to the prehistoric, flightless "terror birds" (Titanis wales).  The feel and look of my assigned egg reminded me that here in the 21st century there still persists a segment of the population that denies the science of evolution.  I had my direction.

The Art 360° Project also gave me the opportunity to stretch my painting style and technique onto a three-dimensional form.  While contemplating where and how to begin, I became transfixed on the hole drilled to vacate the shell's content which made me aware of the exterior and interior possibilities available if I were to open up the egg to become a more complex sculptural form.  Using a Dremel tool, I cut a larger opening in the shell mimicking the form of the egg to expose the interior. Envisioning a large cave entrance, I added stalactites and walls of Iridescence, a beautiful surface for any aspiring Neanderthal.  The egg rests on a bed of layered, leftover paint from my work over the past 6 years appearing as geological rock stratum that would have settled over eons of time.